NAMEPA Hot Topics

by Ruth A. Streveler, Ph.D.

Ruth Streveler
“I am honored to be a guest contributor to the NAMEPA blog. I had a chance to work with NAMEPA in my previous position at the Colorado School of Mines, and so am pleased to be able to participate again. My hope is to bring to the NAMEPA community research that may be of interest.”



Hot Topic: A new model for thinking about … and talking about … engineering student support centers

Though engineering student support centers (ESSCs) have common goals, the methods ESSCs use to reach these goal and the ways they define “success” often varies.  This variability has sometimes made it difficult to think about ESSCs collectively and may have hampered the ability to communicate about results or engage in strategic planning. A common language[…]

Hot Topic: The Impact of Discrimination

For my first article, I have selected a recent neuroscience article that discusses the lasting, negative cumulative impact of discrimination on the body.  The researchers describe a concrete, physical mechanism that contributes to the poorer health often seen in communities of color. As the authors state in the article: “There’s a fair amount of research[…]

NAMEPA Hot Topics Blog Launches

Ruth A. Streveler is an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. Dr. Streveler is working with the NAMEPA leadership to bring research of interest to the NAMEPA community. Her primary research interests have been investigating students’ understanding of difficult concepts in engineering science, and helping engineering faculty conduct rigorous research[…]

Ruth A. Streveler is an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. Her primary research interests have been investigating students’ understanding of difficult concepts in engineering science, and helping engineering faculty conduct rigorous research in engineering education. She has a passion for neuroscience and is intrigued by the applications of neuroscience research for engineering education. To date, Ruth has been the Principle Investigator or co-Principle Investigator of ten grants funded by the US National Science Foundation. She has published articles in the Journal of Engineering Education and the International Journal of Engineering Education and has contributed chapters to the Cambridge Handbook of Engineering Education Research. She has presented workshops to over 500 engineering faculty and practicing engineers on four continents and has won two Helen Plants Awards for the best non-traditional workshop presented at the Frontiers in Education Conference. In 2015, Ruth was inducted as a Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education.